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Water Levels & Climate Change

Adaptation Strategies to Climate Change Induced Low Water Levels

One of the key characteristics of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Region is the highly integrated nature of its economy and environment. Many of the region’s key industries rely on its water. Analysis shows that low water levels, primarily driven by climate change, are likely to remain the region’s reality for decades to comes. This poses significant risks to many of the region’s sectors and industries critical to Canada’s and America’s economy. This study will draw on the findings, data analysis, and methodology from Phase One, Low Water Blues: An Economic Impact Assessment of Future Low Water Levels in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River to conduct a cost-benefit analysis of proposed adaptations to this low water future.


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Restoring Water Levels on Lake Michigan-Huron

April 7, 2016 | CGLR

A Cost-Benefit Analysis

A 2014 report from CGLR and Mowat calculated that if extremely low water levels persisted until 2050, the adverse effects on the Great Lakes economy could reach $18.82 billion (USD). Read More

Vital Capital

December 21, 2015 | CGLR

Using Alternative Procurement and Financing Models to Capitalize on the ‘Infrastructure Moment’ in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Region

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Low Water Blues

June 26, 2014 | CGLR

An Economic Impact Assessment of Future Low Water Levels in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River

If future Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River water levels remain near the low end of the historic range for sustained periods, what could this mean for the enormous regional economy that depends on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River? Read More